Robotics and Law

Robotics and Law

On Friday 24 May, our Chair fellow P. Alberto Carrara, L.C. with  Avv. Emanuela Cerasella, coordinator of the GdN subgroup on neurolaw, is organizing a conference entitled Robotics and Law. This event is within the Neurobioethics Masterclass.  Among the participants there will be the Magistrate Dr. Giuseppe Corasaniti, a well-known scholar and expert on issues related to the legal problems in regards of information.

Law and Life: dignity in living and dying between informed consent, advance treatment provisions and the ordinance n.207 of 2018 of the Constitutional Court

Law and Life: dignity in living and dying between informed consent, advance treatment provisions and the ordinance n.207 of 2018 of the Constitutional Court

On Friday 5 April (15: 30-19: 00, Master Classroom, 1st floor) the Group of Neurobioethics, coordinated by our Chair fellow Fr. Alberto Carrara, L.C., is organizing an interdisciplinary dialogue entitled: Law and Life: dignity in living and dying between informed consent, advance treatment provisions and the ordinance n.207 of 2018 of the Constitutional Court. The speakers are: Avv. Emanuela Cerasella, Avv. Tania Cerasella, Dr. Francesco Ognibene, Dr. Suor Costanza Galli, Prof. Giuseppe Noia and Dr. Angelo Mainini.

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Program

15:30

Greetings from the Academic Authorities

Presentation

Prof. Father Alberto Carrara, L.C.

(Coordinator GdN, Corresponding Member of the Pontifical Academy for Life)

4:00 pm

Coordinates and introduces legal issues

Avv. Emanuela Cerasella

(Lawyer of the Court of Rome, patron of the Supreme Court of Cassation and other superior jurisdictions; coordinator of the neuro-law research and subgroup of the GdN)

16:30

“The sacredness of the good life and the centrality of the constitutional triad: life, person and dignity in the anticipated treatment provisions. Communication at the heart of DAT. Which legal institute recognize in the DAT? “

Avv. Tania Cerasella

(Advocate for the Court of Rome before the Supreme Court of Cassation and other higher jurisdictions, member of the GdN)

17:00

“Media: questions of life and death”

Dr. Francesco Ognibene

(Editor-in-chief of Avvenire, Coordinator of the weekly “E ‘Vita” insert)

17:30

“Palliative care as an antidote to euthanasia and therapeutic obstinacy, in the light of law n. 219/2017 “

Dr. Suor Costanza Galli

(Director of the complex palliative care unit – Tuscany North / West company)

18:00

“The boundaries of life in curing the incurables: always taking care of”

Prof. Giuseppe Noia

(Director, Perinatal Hospice – Center for Prenatal Palliative Care – S. Mother Teresa of Calcutta – Gemelli Hospital, Rome; President of the Heart Foundation in a Goccia-Onlus; President AIGOC)

18:30

“Born to live and born to die, the experience of care and assistance to people with advanced disease”

Dr. Angelo Mainini

(Health Director of the “Maddalena Grassi Foundation” in Milan)

19:00 Conclusions

Dr. Francesco Ognibene

Buffet

Neuroethical Considerations of Artificial Intelligence

Neuroethical Considerations of Artificial Intelligence

 

SOPHIA, a humanoid robot produced by the company of “Hanson Robotics”, was activated and presented to the world in 2016. In 2017 it receives citizenship in Saudi Arabia. For the last session of the year, BINCA prepared a particularly controversial subject.

For more infromation contact: mariel.kalkach@anahuac.mx

 

A Week with Stephen M. Stahl – Masterclass of Psychopharmacology

A Week with Stephen M. Stahl – Masterclass of Psychopharmacology

Stephen M. Stahl, one of the most important psychiatrists and pharmacologists in the world, will be in Rome, at the Pontifical University Regina Apostolorum – European University of Rome for a full day of the psychopharmacology conference. The event is a major scientific event during which some of the most current topics, both basic and clinical research, in the field of psychopharmacology and clinical practice will be discussed. World-renowned psychopharmacologists and psychiatrists, through a critical review of their fields of investigation, will offer the opportunity for participants to take a look at the future of research. The total duration of the course is 7 hours and will release ECM 4.9. Application Fee € 80. There are 200 seats available. You need to fill in the online forum and registration form by clicking here and accessing the appropriate platform.

 

 

VIII International Bioethics Conference in Bogotá

VIII International Bioethics Conference in Bogotá

By Santiago Marcet – 

The Director of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights, Dr. Alberto García Gómez, attended the VII International Congress of Bioethics held by the Universidad Militar Nueva Granada in Bogotá, Colombia, during the 3rd, 4th and 5th of October.

 

In his lecture titled “Neurobioethics, Placing the Human Being at the Center of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Law” Dr. García reviewed some of the most prominent topics in the field of neurotechnology, and as the title suggests, he was able to explore the ways in which the human being ought to remain the gravitational center of such a rapidly evolving reality.

The first issue Dr. García addressed was the need to re-formulate the ways in which we think about our brain. What is the relation between mind and brain? Despite the common claims that both are one and the same thing, we are still unable to locate the human sense of identity and self within any of the 28 substructures of the brain. The intangibility of human singularity invites us to think of the human being not only as an material entity, but also as a transcendent one: by means of rationality, we are able to place our inclinations beyond the contingencies of our material body, interact with others in society and foment virtue.

 

This perception of the human being introduced Dr. García’s next discussion, namely the bioethics of neuroscience. As he insisted, a position open to progress and change must belong to all bioethicists, as long as the overarching anthropological view is not lost. Moral judgement, he stated, must focus on two elements when talking about neuroscientific ends: the means by which they are achieved and their intention. Drawing on this distinction, Dr. García talked about the essential differences between therapy and enhancement, which lead him to address Transhumanism in a neutrally critical way: the disposition to endow the human being with a higher degree of dignity by means of biological enhancement can prove to be a slippery slope, and common good must prevail over individual dispositions. Many questions surround this topic: does all scientific advance constitute progress? Will enhanced human capabilities increase the already existing gap between the rich and the poor? Will the transhuman being constitute a new paradigm that will make the concept of human singularity blur? These and many other issues should always be addressed bearing the idea of human dignity in mind.

 

Reversing the actors of his previous discussion, Dr. García talked about the neuroscience of ethics. Or in other words, the ways in which neuroscience can help us understand the intricacies of our moral thought. He explained the problems that arise from the implantation of recent theories that deny the existence of human free will. If there is indeed a measurable relation between certain brain structures and human behavior, if human choices are nothing more than the end of a chain of causality that is merely material, he states, the concepts of responsibility (in moral terms) and imputability (in legal terms) lose all meaning.

 

Dr. García finished his lecture reminding us that human dignity is not derived from the complexity of our biological structures nor from our mental functions and faculties. Rather, it is found in the metaphysical reality that goes along the fact of being human: transcendence.