Video – Extracts from “Multiculturalism and Interreligious Perspective on Informed Consent” Workshop

Video – Extracts from “Multiculturalism and Interreligious Perspective on Informed Consent” Workshop

 

The UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights hold its 6th international Bioethics, multiculturalism and religion workshop to discuss issues of informed consent and clinical research on February 21-23. As part of the i-Consent consortium (a project funded by the European Union – Horizon 2020), the ethical reflections of the workshop focused on the multicultural and interdisciplinary dimension of the ethical requirements of informed consent applied to transnational / clinical research and vaccination.

 

 

First Interdisciplinary Neuroethics Diploma Course

First Interdisciplinary Neuroethics Diploma Course

1st Interdisciplinary Neuroethics Diploma Course

Anáhuac México Norte University and the Bioética Clínica y Neuroética Anáhuac (BINCA) in collaboration  with UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights, Faith and Science Institute, The Interdisciplinary Research Group in Neurobiothics (GdN), and with the support of Faculty of Education, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Economics and Business, Faculty of Psychology, and Faculty of Bioethics is launching the1st Interdisciplinary Neuroethics Diploma Course. This course will be available in English and in Spanish. You can take it from any part of the world and attend to the live lectures.

Objectives

To give basic knowledge to the students about what is neuroethics, from an interdisciplinary perspective that allows appreciation of its neuroscientific and philosophic identities. From this, the course should make evident problems and novelties arising in diverse knowledge domains, at the philosophic and practical level. Likewise, we aim to prompt connections and interdisciplinary dialogue among the professors for the course’s benefit and the ignition of future collaborations. For further information read the detailed program following this link.

Start: 1st September 2018

Duration: 100 hours 

For further information and application: mariel.kalkach@anahuac.mx or yael.zoneszainl@anahuac.mx

 

Structure

Master in Global Bioethics Online

Master in Global Bioethics Online

The UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights in collaboration with The University of Anáhuac (Faculty of Bioethics), the Holy Spirit College, and the Ateneo Regina Apostolorum is lannching the NEW Master in Global Bioethics online.

Objectives & Outcomes:

  • Training future university professors, health care professionals, biomed researchers, social and political agents with high academic knowledge and skills in bioethics.
  • Providing an integral formation in the field of global bioethics, allowing participants to develop their professional activity, both in the private and public sphere, with social responsibility and grounded in person-center approach.

Addressed to people interested in:

  • Promoting human dignity, human rights and duties in the field of life sciences and medicine as well as in social, legal and political environments
  • Studying and researching about the biomedical, philosophical, social and legal aspects of the contemporary important and cutting-edge bioethical dilemmas
  • Developing capacity for interdisciplinary, international and cross-cultural dialogue to explore new solutions for the preservation of health and the improvement of individual well-being and social welfare.

Program:

  • Concept of Human Being in Bioethics and Global Bioethics
  • Trends and Currents of Thought in Bioethics
  • Research Techniques and Databases
  • Ethical Fundamentals of Bioethics
  • Clinical and Bioethical Aspects at the Beginning of Life
  • Bioethics, Sexuality and Human Reproduction
  • Bioethical and Clinical Aspects at the End of Life
  • Bioethics and Medical Act
  • Bioethics and Health Management/Health Care Policies
  • Bioethics and Biolaw
  • Global Bioethics
  • Global Bioethics and International Human Rights: The Human Right to Health
  • Emerging Technologies and Global Bioethics: Neuro-Nano-Info Technologies
  • Cross-cultural Dialogue in Global Bioethics
  • Public Health Ethics
  • Bioethics and Social Problems
  • Bioethics and Environment
  • Research Methodology in Bioethics

For further infromationa and application contact: Marinés Girault, maria.girault@anahuac.mx

Start: 5 November 2018

Academic Load: 1370 hours of student work

Duration: Two years studying part-time

Hours: Available all day

Scholarships: Available

Certifications:

UAM: Master Certificate*

UNESCO Chair: Diploma

HSC: 30 US Credits

APRA: 60 ECTS

*Validity of Studies Recognition issued by the Secretary of Public Education by means of Presidential Decree, published in the Official Journal of the Federation in November 26, 1982. SEP Approval in Process
A Collaboration to Share Love and Generosity

A Collaboration to Share Love and Generosity

 

Based on the values of cooperation and generosity, the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights and the social program Contagia Alegria have reached an agreement and a common goal. Contagia Alegria was born as a social action to help children and people in need react to and live with disease. Through joy and happiness volunteers try to brighten the patient’s day and offer him and his relatives hope. Indeed, this initiative also represents a great opportunity for volunteers who experience the beauty of truly giving and receiving unconditional love. The collaboration is part of the UNESCO Chair’s Global Art Interest Area, and recognizes the art of the clown as culturally significant and medically beneficial. Each organization will support the other’s initiatives, and they will work together to create joint ones.

 

 

 

The Latest Advances in Genetics:  CRISPR and the Ethics of GM humans

The Latest Advances in Genetics: CRISPR and the Ethics of GM humans

 

Starting from a debate about to what extend we should use technology to correct genetics illness and enhance human race, Father Joseph Tham, Fellow of the UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights, will give a talk on new technologies and on how these may affect a new strong, healthier, and smarter offspring from an ethical perspective.

After the Human Genome Project, the field of genetics had laid dormant until recently.  First there was the discovery of the field of epigenetics and environment’s impact on genes inheritance.  The more surprising advance of CRISPR technology allows scientists and amateurs to edit the DNA of plants, animals and humans.  There is a heated debate about whether we should use this technology not only to correct genetic illnesses, but also to enhance the human race.  We are on the verge of creating superior offspring who would be healthier, smarter, and stronger. Could such technology change human nature in a radical and possibly disastrous way?  The conference will look at the state of the technology and offer some ethical reflections on its use.

 

 

Ethical Challenges in Clinical Experimentation and Vaccines

Ethical Challenges in Clinical Experimentation and Vaccines

By Fausto Martinez & Andrea Iannone –

Bioethics is the discipline that studies human behavior in healthcare and life sciences. It also examines values, rational, and moral principles at the basis of decisions in medicine and biology. Bioethicists recognize that mankind has always pursued greater knowledge, and that the goal of scientific research is to obtain concrete benefits for patients. Therefore, bioethicists are often concerned about the researcher or doctor on one hand, and the patient as the subject of experimentation on the other. In between them lie a vast array of recent technological developments (for example, biotechnology) that stimulate a series of questions. Is science “unstoppable” or does it have limits? Is biomedical technology truly morally neutral? Is emphasizing the human utility of scientific investigation and experimentation ethically relevant?

Researchers addressed these and other questions at the third symposium by A.S.I.E.R.I (Asociación de Investigadores Españoles en la República Italiana, the Association of Spanish Researchers in Italy) on May 18, 2018, at the the Real Academia de España en Roma, Italy. The topic of the conference was “Responsible Innovation and Research”. Further discussion centered on the I-Consent project, funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 Programme. Briefly put, the project aims to improve guidelines on informed consent in vulnerable populations under a gender perspective.

 

Innovation and research can be defined as “responsible” if they respect human rights. Based on the ethical and juridical principles of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, human rights are human beings’ inherent moral and legal entitlements to dignity, liberty, and equality at any historical moment, in any context. Therefore, the human dignity of both the patient and the researcher must be respected in scientific research and medical practice.

Since they can experience pain, distress and lasting damage, animals are also entitled to humane treatment in medical and scientific research. Whenever possible, appropriately licensed scientists should experiment with specimens with lower neurophysiological sensitivity, thus reducing the number of live vertebrates involved. When animals with higher pain sensitivity are necessary for experimental purposes, researches are advised to adopt techniques to avoid suffering, stress, or injury.

During the symposium, Prof. Alberto García, Director of UNESCO Chair in Bioethics and Human Rights at Università Europea di Roma and the Pontifical Athenaeum Regina Apostolorum, underscored the importance of respecting the human patient’s privacy. This process includes compliance on the part of the experimenting institution with data collection and sharing regulation being paramount. Patients have a right to know what data is collected, with whom it is shared, and how they can rectify or delete it – if they so choose – in the future.

According to García, non-discriminatory and non-stigmatizing medical research practices ensure the equal treatment of patients. He also stated that patients’ rights need to be observed not only during research, but also after its completion. Once a drug has been released onto the market, there must be a phase of pharmaceutical vigilance to monitor identify and evaluate previously unreported adverse reactions to the drug.

 

 

In his last point, Garcia discussed the I-Consent project. In particular, our UNESCO Chair will explore and analyze baseline knowledge of IC for the development and validation of ethical issues concerning informed consent in translational/clinical research and vaccination. Clear informed consent procedures ensure that patients’ dignity is upheld. Informed Consent is a document of utmost important for a patient since it allows him to voluntarily decide to participate in research. However, the research’s objectives are often not shared with the concerned stakeholders. That is why informed consent must become a process during which patients have the essential information clearly presented to them. Innovative tools, such as videos, comic strips, or apps might favor communication among all stakeholders. If not, those unable to consent – often the most vulnerable among us – risk seeing their human rights violated.